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Harvest Dinner and BABES is Hiring!

31 Oct

November is a month for giving thanks and we would like to take this oppurtunity to give a shout out to two of our wonderful Peer Volunteers Pat Migliore and Kelly Bernard. They both are so dedicated to the BABES program – whether its facilitating support group, setting up for an event, tabling at a health fair or doing the dishes after group, they are always there for us and we appreciate you both very much. From the bottom of our hearts, THANK YOU!!!

-Nicole

kelly and pat 10.30.14

The BABES office will be closed for the Thanksgiving holiday on November 27th and 28th. We hope that everyone has safe and enjoyable holiday. Click here to see the BABES calendar of events for the month of November!


BABES Annual Harvest Dinner

Friday, November 21, 2014

6-8pm

YWCA 5th and Seneca

thanksgiving

BABES members and up to 2 guests are invited to join us for our annual harvest dinner. We will have a full Thanksgiving-style meal and an educational presentation on

HIV and Aging with Dr. Peter Shalit

Please RSVP to 206-720-5566 or the_staff@babesnetwork.org


hiring

BABES Network-YWCA is hiring for a Lead Case Manager!!

The Lead Case Manager will provide non-medical case management services to people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWH) by phone or in person. They will work closely with the Program Manager to coach peer staff to maintain effective program structures and systems related to Non-Medical Case Management activities and lead programmatic compliance activities.

Click here to read the full job posting and to apply!

$18.24-$21.89 per hour
30-35 hours a week, weekdays with limited weekend and evening work required

 

BABES Celebrates 25 Years!

1 Oct

The Fall 2014 BABES Talking Newsletter is stories from women about:

‘What 25 years of BABES means to them’! Read founding Executive Director Jesse Chipps’ story below:

It’s been 25 years since I accepted Kass Anderton’s invitation to come to her house for a bring-your-favorite-take-out pot luck.  That was the day I met the women who would become some of my closest friends and biggest source of support for dealing with HIV.  It’s funny how a few hours can change your life, but that evening changed mine.  I was in an unfamiliar neighborhood, with women I didn’t know at all, who were different from me in every way I can name…except one: we all had HIV.

I learned a lot of things that night.  I laugh, now, at the closed off person I was then, and how that night broke me wide open.  What did I learn?  I learned that heterosexual women are not just the people who were mean to me in high school.  I learned that people who are religious can also be incredibly kind and open.  I learned that people who were in the military don’t necessarily have values that are different than mine.  I learned that a person can be incredibly ill and incredibly strong at the same time.  Most important: I learned that I could walk into a room and have my first thought be, “Oh, no…these are sooooooo not my people,” but leave, many hours later, realizing that they soooooooooo WERE my people.

For the past 25 years I have had the honor to share a meal, talk, cry and, yes, sing karaoke with BABES.  We have supported each other through pneumocystis, sick kids, employment bias, mental illness, shingles, addiction, poverty, early and awful medications, lipodistrophy, domestic violence, and sometimes death.  We also shared spaghetti, watching some of those kids grow into adulthood, silly art projects, and M&Ms.  I know that I’m a better person for knowing the BABES, and I often question whether I would still be alive without their support.  That was true 25 years ago, and it’s true today.

Nicole, Brenda, Tranisha, Kelly, Pat, and every BABE:  Thanks for being there for me and for each other.

~Jesse Chipps

Click here to read the full newsletter!

 

group

Stella Steps Out

Thanks to everyone for an exciting event and fundraiser! Together, we raised more than $49,000 to support women living with HIV and their families! See event photos on SmugMug.

This year was also the 25th anniversary of BABES. Watch this video to see what has changed for women with HIV since 1989.

Many thanks to all who made Stella a success!

25 Years of BABES from Shannon Gee/Geez Louise Media on Vimeo.

To Cure or Not to Cure?

29 May

The Summer BABES Talking newsletter is thoughts from BABES members about what it would look and feel like to them if there was a cure for HIV!

aids ribbon

Here is Eldonna’s thoughts on what a cure would look and feel like to her:

Ever since Timothy Ray Brown (the Berlin patient, 2007) was cured of HIV there have been quiet conversations among family and friends about the possibility of a cure. But that’s all it was, just talk. Today, because of Mr. Brown’s treatment we know so much more, and a cure is becoming nearly a reality. So what would a “CURE” mean to you?

In my life, for me, that idea creates more questions than answers. Would everyone still living get the cure? Would we be required to get the cure? Would AIDS service organizations just close up shop or would they be phased out over time? Would there still be case management and/or clinics like Madison? Would those of us who have AIDS and are disabled be required to return to work after the cure? Would HIV/AIDS funding be cut from the national budgets? Would prevention still be a priority? Would there be support groups for people who are cured and trying to find balance in their new reality? And most importantly, how would I spend all that time that is being taken up with doctor’s appointments and self-advocacy?

I was diagnosed on July 1st of 1985 just seven days after my 21st birthday. My whole adult life has included living with HIV. Quite frankly, I did not expect to live this long and, I’m not sure that I know any other way to live. Please don’t get me wrong, I want a cure to be available. No one should have to live with our reality. But I’m also afraid of the unknown. I’m pretty adept at advocating for myself and use a minimum of services but if I run into trouble I have that safety-net of case management. I just survived breast cancer, am turning fifty and I’m entering yet another phase of my life. If the cure was available to everybody in ten years when I’m turning sixty would I go for it? I honestly don’t know but I hope so.

But here is something I do know! Along with continued self-care, medical care and self-advocating, we as HIV + people need to start having earnest conversations on policy regarding the “CURE”. As always, we need to be proactive. We need to look at the science and both the pro’s (and there will be many) and the con’s and create smart policy. Otherwise we may be just as overwhelmed as the day when we were first diagnosed.

To read the full Summer Newsletter and check out our calendar of events click here!

 

 

Community Q and A on HIV Cures!

1 Apr

Partner in Strength

March 10th is National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day!

28 Feb

Click here to view the BABES March Calendar!

NWGHAAD

NWGHAAD logo

In recognition of National Women & Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, help us get the word out to women about the importance of HIV testing. Prior to March 10th, forward this information to women in your professional and personal circles.  And share it on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+ and your websites.

Learn more about National Women & Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day and learn about HIV and HIV testing.

TAKE CHARGE of your health! If you’re sexually active now or in the past, ask your health provider for an HIV test. IF you have HIV, there is treatment that can help you stay healthy.

Be INFORMED! Take CHARGE! Protect YOURSELF! Get TESTED!

~

HIV Awareness. TAKE ACTION with Thunderclap!
National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day is coming up very soon. To take action, we invite you to sign up for the national HIV Awareness. Take Action! Thunderclap.

Not sure what Thunderclap is? It’s a new online tool that allows National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day supporters (people like you!) to say something together. If enough people support our HIV Awareness. Take Action! Thunderclap, a message will blast out at exactly the same time on March 10, 2014. Signing up is easy; do it today!

1.  Click “Support with Twitter,” “Support with Facebook,” and/or “Support with Tumblr” and get the word out to your followers     and friends to do the same.
2.  Visit www.womenshealth.gov/nwghaad for additional ideas on how you can take action.
3.  On Monday, March 10, 2014, watch as everyone’s messages are shared at 12:00 p.m. EDT.
Your tweet or post could empower someone to get tested or to seek treatment if they are HIV positive. That’s why we need your support. Please forward this message!

Thank you on behalf of Public Health – Seattle & King County, BABES Network-YWCA, and U.S. DHHS Region X Office on Women’s Health and HIV Regional Resource Network Program