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Peer Advocate shares her experience in DC for World AIDS Day!

5 Jan

Moving Forward with HIV in America: Drawing Strength from Our Past and Empowering Today’s Leaders

I was invited by a PWN-USA sister and PACHA member to attend an Office of National AIDS Policy event to commemorate World AIDS Day, which is held annually on December 1. This event would be the final public event under the Obama Administration. It was youth-focused event seeking to channel the energy and wisdom that brought AIDS out of the shadows and to achieve the goals of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy through 2020. The event featured multiple generations of HIV/AIDS advocates, spanning leaders from the beginning of the epidemic through the present day.

The programming started with a welcome from Amy Lansky, the Director of the Office of National AIDS Policy (ONAP). She then passed it along to the person who put this event together, George Fistonich, the Policy Advisory for ONAP. He reminded some and educated others on looking back at the past eight years of change. He went through this very informative infographic blog by Cecilia Muñoz, Director of the White House Domestic Policy Council, called What We’ve Done to Address HIV/AIDS in America during the Obama Administration. I would definitely advise everyone to read this post and share it widely! Amy came back to briefly talk about the National HIV/AIDS Strategy 2016 Progress Report and the five things we should know, which are:

(1) Made national progress on nine key indicators.
(2) Established three new developmental indicators.
(3) Completed 76% and initiated 22% of 91 Federal actions planned for 2016.
(4) Implemented the Strategy in communities across the nation.
(5) Addressed challenges to meet our 2020 goals.

Learn more about the National HIV/AIDS Strategy at aids.gov/2020.

After the presentations, we had an emotional and interactive dialogue with four panelists and two moderators, White House staff members Raffi Freedman-Gurspan and George Fistonich. Panelists included Jeffrey S. Crowley (Program Director of the National HIV/AIDS Initiative at the O’Neill Institute), Dazon Dixon Diallo (Founder and President of SisterLove), Daniel Driffin (HIV/AIDS activist), and Kimi Farrington (2014 NMAC Youth Scholar).

The panel was structured around responding to clips from How to Survive a Plague, a film which follows the founding of ACT UP and TAG (Treatment Action Group) and the rise of an underground drug market in opposition to the prohibitively expensive (and sometimes toxic) AZT. Around the globe, 16 million people are alive today thanks to their efforts. The folks on the panel that were present during the ACT UP days reminded us what it was like then and the dramatic actions they took to be heard. During that time friends, lovers, and children were dying every day and no one was doing anything about it.

We also talked about how far we’ve come and one of the HIV advocates who has been doing this work for 20 plus years said she still felt hopeful that we can continue building and making strides towards change, even with the Trump presidency ahead of us. This person was not discouraged because she was very excited and proud of our up and coming young leaders who are doing and will continue to do phenomenal work in the many movements that change lives.

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It was my first time watching clips from How to Survive a Plague and one day I will watch it in its entirety. It was emotional to watch those courageous people march around the National Mall holding the ashes of their loved ones and dumping them on the lawn of the White House as protest against the silence of the Reagan and Bush administrations.

One of the audience members spoke about the experience of living in the South where, as we know, a lot of southern states did not adopt the expansion of Medicaid, a huge resource for people living with HIV to receive the appropriate medical attention and make sure they’re insured so that their medications and doctors’ appointments are covered. This young gay black man said it’s a totally different story for him and his community who live in places in the South that are struggling with the lack of resources and opportunities. They’re not safe or supported to be able to speak up for themselves or others, which makes progress really slow.

He then challenged folks in the room to come where they’re at to witness what’s going on. He was right. I know the statistics and barriers in other states but I haven’t dealt with the same barriers living in Washington my whole life. Washington is one of the highest virally suppressed states in the nation and we’re one of few states that declared to reduce new HIV diagnoses by 50% by 2020 with our END AIDS in WA proclamation by Governor Inslee.

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My big take away from the trip is that I want to work on doing more for other people in states that don’t benefit from the same resources and opportunities as I do. I see myself moving to the South, most likely to New Orleans, to start working towards this personal and professional goal of mine. I could risk losing a lot that makes my care very comfortable and my health being on top, but it’s the end game that’s more important. I want to help others because it was the help that I received that saved my life.

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Check out this blog post in honor of World AIDS Day by Positive Women’s Network USA.

Written by: Tranisha Arzah, BABES Peer Advocate

 

National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day!

1 Mar

2016 NWGHAAD Flyer - size

Empowering Women

1 Apr

Langston Hughes African American Film Festival Presents

Positively Beautiful

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A Story about Five Strangers from South Africa who became activists despite stigma, fear and shame. Their story is one of a quiet victory over adversity and struggle. Positively Beautiful is a story about life, love, and friendship in the age of HIV.

When: April 14th 2015 – 5pm start
Where: Langston Hughes Performing Arts Institute
104 17th Ave S. Seattle WA 98144

Free tickets available through www.brownpapertickets.com Use code HVTU


2015 Stand Against Racism: Race & Health

When:   Friday, April 24
Where:  Town Hall Seattle 1119 8th Ave, Seattle, WA 98101
Join the YWCA’s 5th annual Stand Against Racism community discussion, presented by the People of Color Executive Council.

This live program begins at noon with featured speaker Dr. Ivor Horn, followed by a panel discussion. Health information and resources will be available; light snacks will be served.

Stand Against Racism keynote speaker

Stand Against Racism is an annual campaign from YWCA USA to build community for those working toward racial justice, and to raise awareness about the negative impacts of racism. Visit www.StandAgainstRacism.org

To register, please email sar@ywcaworks.org.


Orca logoORCA LIFT GETS YOU WHERE YOU NEED TO GO. FOR LESS.

Now there’s a more affordable way to get to work, school, shopping, day care or basically anywhere else you need to go. ORCA LIFT is a new reduced transit fare program that helps you get more out of your transit system, while saving up to 50% or more.

Eligibility is based on household income and income verification is required.

Call BABES for more details, 206-720-5566, we can help you get your reduced fare ORCA Card.

March 10th is National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day!

28 Feb

Click here to view the BABES March Calendar!

NWGHAAD

NWGHAAD logo

In recognition of National Women & Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, help us get the word out to women about the importance of HIV testing. Prior to March 10th, forward this information to women in your professional and personal circles.  And share it on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+ and your websites.

Learn more about National Women & Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day and learn about HIV and HIV testing.

TAKE CHARGE of your health! If you’re sexually active now or in the past, ask your health provider for an HIV test. IF you have HIV, there is treatment that can help you stay healthy.

Be INFORMED! Take CHARGE! Protect YOURSELF! Get TESTED!

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HIV Awareness. TAKE ACTION with Thunderclap!
National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day is coming up very soon. To take action, we invite you to sign up for the national HIV Awareness. Take Action! Thunderclap.

Not sure what Thunderclap is? It’s a new online tool that allows National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day supporters (people like you!) to say something together. If enough people support our HIV Awareness. Take Action! Thunderclap, a message will blast out at exactly the same time on March 10, 2014. Signing up is easy; do it today!

1.  Click “Support with Twitter,” “Support with Facebook,” and/or “Support with Tumblr” and get the word out to your followers     and friends to do the same.
2.  Visit www.womenshealth.gov/nwghaad for additional ideas on how you can take action.
3.  On Monday, March 10, 2014, watch as everyone’s messages are shared at 12:00 p.m. EDT.
Your tweet or post could empower someone to get tested or to seek treatment if they are HIV positive. That’s why we need your support. Please forward this message!

Thank you on behalf of Public Health – Seattle & King County, BABES Network-YWCA, and U.S. DHHS Region X Office on Women’s Health and HIV Regional Resource Network Program

Happy New Year!!

2 Jan

Happy New Year from all of us here at BABES Network-YWCA! To see what is going on in January click here to view the calendar!

Banner A3D 2014

Thursday, January 23rd 8:30am-4pm in Olympia, WA.

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Join hundreds of advocates in our State Capitol for a day of advocacy trainings,

a rally in the Capitol Rotunda and in-person meetings with your legislators.

We will be in Olympia 8:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

 No experience needed
We provide the  advocacy training!

 Need a ride? We’ve got you covered!
Transportation is available (at no cost)
from around the state.

REGISTER TODAY! Go to www.whacan.org and follow the links to

register for AIDS Action & Awareness Day (it’s free!),
call (206) 957-1750 or call us for more information 206-720-5566

Click here to learn more about the upcoming Seattle Advocacy Trainings available!

Sponsored by:

WHACAN LogoLLAA Logo